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19 March, 2014 (6:00 – 8:00 PM): Lessons from Revolutionary Systems

by Communications Team on January 31, 2014  •   Print This Post Print This Post   •   

19 March, 2014 (6:00 – 8:00 PM): Lessons from Revolutionary Systems

Dr. Mark Maier Dr. Mark W. Maier, The Aerospace Corporation, Distinguished Engineer

Presentation: The most famous systems, the ones with revolutionary effect, were developed against a background of fairly similar systems. Moreover, the reasons for their great success were often not fully anticipated by their designers. In this talk we will examine several particularly famous systems whose architectural histories are well enough known to extract major lessons. The two major systems to be considered will be the DC-3 and the Global Positioning System, although we’ll also relate the lessons to several other famous successes. The most important lessons are:

  • There are threshold levels of capability, rarely known in advance, that produce non-linear effect.
  • Finding the threshold is not exactly accidental, but neither is it a certain choice.
  • Revolution requires a co-evolution of user CONOPS and system technology.

Bio: Dr. Mark W. Maier is an author and practitioner of systems architecting, the art and science of creating complex systems. He is co-author, with Dr. Eberhardt Rechtin, of The Art of Systems Architecting, Third Edition, CRC Press, the mostly widely used textbook on systems architecting. He has also authored more than 50 papers on systems engineering, architecting, and sensor analysis. Since 1998 he has been employed by The Aerospace Corporation, a non-profit corporation that operates a Federally Funded Research and Development Center with oversight responsibility for the U.S. National Security Space Program, where he holds the position of Distinguished Engineer.

>>Check out the Event Flyer Here<<

Go to www.incose-cc.org/registration/ to register

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